My Background

I am a consultant and entrepreneur who is task-oriented and results-driven. I also pay attention to details while working on building sustainable wealth. I'm enthusiastic in finding new innovative solutions using a combination of managerial and technical skills.

I'm also an avid investor in small ideas, keen reader and social activist who is enthusiastic in finding new opportunities. I'm a strategist who is systematic in approaching challenges. This exposure lead me to be interested in human interaction and to appreciate what the human mind is capable of achieving. Through my vast interaction with different people, I managed to increasing my personal network.

It has became clear to me at an early stage of my life that I have the ability to spot opportunities which made me by nature, an


  1. defined as a person who establishes an enterprise with the aim of solving social problems or effecting social change.

As an individual with a positive outlook towards my challenges, I've embarked on the most interesting journeys in my life which I intend on blogging. These are the glimpse of my trials and tribulations because I believe that: "You must believe you are the best and then make sure that you are...".. I was once told that: "If you don't have enough money then you haven't helped enough people yet". The road to riches is paved with acquisition of specific knowledge.

Favorite Quote:

“A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

My Work Experience:
Entrepreneur & Consultant

Previous Position(s)

Executive Director | Dihlakanyane Trading (Pty) Ltd.
Cullinan, South Africa | February 2012 - April 2016
Director of Operations | Dithokeng Cleaning Services cc
Cullinan, South Africa | August 2006 - December 2007
Managing Director | Keyamo Management Solutions (Pty) Ltd.
Johannesburg, South Africa | April 2003 - November 2016
Managing Member | Mamphake Office Supplies cc
Rayton, South Africa | July 1999 - February 2017

Documan Consulting | Proprietor
Rayton, South Africa | 2012 - 2017

Current Occupation(s)

MEP Digital Systems | Director

Rayton, South Africa | 2017 - Present

The company specialize in digital strategy implementation in smart facilities using sensors actuators and other digital instrumentation.

Consulting Services
My Education and Skill(s):
  • Managerial:
  • I manage business operations within the information technology environment. I use Geographical Information Systems (GIS), Building Information Modelling (BIM), Project Management as well as Accounting programs. I studied management and I have experience in evaluating, preparing bids as well as compiling project programs, I assist clients with the planning processes, risk mitigation, evaluations, and presentations. I also prepared costing/estimates and condition reports. I supervise and manage processes as well as allocate work and project scheduling. I do marketing, liaise with customer, as well as assist in developing new and improving existing range of products and services.
  • Technical:
  • I design using computer-aided draughting (CAD) software as well as HTML, Visual Basic, SketchUp Pro, CoralDraw as well as programming in Python. I studied Architecture; Mechanical and Electrical engineering. I also configure computer hardware as well as setup networks. I prepare sketches, detailed drawings, and schematics including drafting of support documentation. My main focus is building expertise and finding sustainable solutions.....

Saturday, February 24, 2018

All about Africans Planning...

Planning is the body of scientific concepts, definitions, behavioral relationships, and assumptions that define the body of knowledge of urban planning. There are eight procedural theories of planning that remain the principal theories of planning procedure today: the rational-comprehensive approach, the incremental approach, the transactive approach, the communicative approach, the advocacy approach, the equity approach, the radical approach, and the humanist or phenomenological approach. Over the past two years, I have focused on the development of a particular area of planning which also links theory to practice. There are two aspects to my studies: placing power and conflict as inevitable and central to planning processes, and grounding planning ideas in an understanding of social diversity and difference. My focus is a response to the problem that most mainstream planning has been developed in the global North, and explicitly or implicitly claims universality, while in fact it is often not helpful to planning practitioners working in the rather different conditions of the global South and East.

 Most planning educators in Africa are products of top rate schools in the global north of Europe and America. The received knowledge by these educators are mostly in contradistinction to the needs, aspirations and indeed, realities of African cities. The result is the transplanting of America and Europe knowledge of city plan to Africa. Yet, the form, functions and processes of these Africa cities are uncommonly different. Many of the attending problems of African cities are not the contending issues in the global north. No wonder African cities remain undeveloped but growing and its major problems remain unsolved. My practical concern with the future of African cities has directed my interest over the past tow years to planning practices on the continent, and how the next generation of professional planners is being education and produced. Hence my role in setting up a planning consulting firm and the various projects which I will be emerging through this network.
More recently I have developed an additional interest in the new economic forces re-shaping African cities, in particular the private-sector driven property development initiatives, often originating with international developers and built environment professionals. These new forces are likely to greatly exacerbate processes of marginalization and exclusion of the poor in cities of Africa.

Friday, November 24, 2017

Fire Protection Systems

Fire protection is the study and practice of mitigating the unwanted effects of potentially destructive fires. It involves the study of the behaviour, compartmentalisation, suppression and investigation of fire and its related emergencies, as well as the research and development, production, testing and application of mitigating systems. In structures, be they land-based, offshore or even ships, the owners and operators are responsible to maintain their facilities in accordance with a design-basis that is rooted in laws, including the local building code and fire code, which are enforced by the Authority Having Jurisdiction.

Buildings must be constructed in accordance with the version of the building code that is in effect when an application for a building permit is made. Building inspectors check on compliance of a building under construction with the building code. Once construction is complete, a building must be maintained in accordance with the current fire code, which is enforced by the fire prevention officers of a local fire department. In the event of fire emergencies, Firefighters, fire investigators, and other fire prevention personnel are called to mitigate, investigate and learn from the damage of a fire. Lessons learned from fires are applied to the authoring of both building codes and fire codes.

There are also programmable, software-based fire protection system which provides early warning of fire or smoke. In addition, These systems support automatic checking of wiring and sensors, corrupt data detection and disconnection of faulty zones. Adjustable sensitivity, alarm verification and pre-alarm provide early warning without causing false alarms and built-in diagnostics improve the level of maintenance-reducing costs. They also include remote diagnostic support, sensor testing, status reports and contamination and near service reports. The peer-to-peer network allows standalone systems to be integrated to provide system-wide alarm reporting, coordinated evacuation, cross-panel cause-and-effect functionality, for large systems and multi-building sites......

Rise and Shine

In every success story, the longest chapter is the one about determination. While success demands many things from us, willpower and determination always come up at the top of the list. Many people believe that we are born with determination and those that succeed are simply the fortunate ones who are born with an abundant supply. But if you ask any successful person they will tell you they were not born with more determination; they always found a way to harness and use what they have more effectively. So, Before you go to sleep, make some basic decisions about what you will do tomorrow, such as what you will wear, what you will eat for lunch, and the route you will take to work. Get after the hardest job right away while you are still fresh and have the energy. Keep in mind that majority of situations that do come up to distract us are not emergencies and do not require us to respond right away. Take a quick break when working on something if you feel your energy fading. Create a vision board, a mind movie, or some system that serves as a constant reminder of what you are working toward.

 Where there is a will, there is a way. If there is a chance in a million that you can do something, anything, to keep what you want from ending, do it. Pry the door open or, if need be, wedge your foot in that door and keep it open. Do the one thing you think you cannot do. Fail at it. Try again. Do better the second time. The only people who never tumble are those who never mount the high wire. This is your moment.

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Embedded Systems

Sensors and actuators are critical components of several embedded systems (ES) and can trigger the incidence of catastrophic events. Sensor and actuator faults detection is difficult and impacts critically the system performance. While integrating sensors and actuators with the rest of (sub) system, there is a need to identify all failure modes and rectify them. Several researchers have addressed software integration issues; however sensors and actuators integration issues were not addressed so far. The integration testing of sensor / actuator within ES is the problem of diagnosing faulty machine in a sequence of two CFSM and solving the diagnostic methodology is used. The integration testing of sensors / actuators is a subset of general diagnostic problem....

Monday, May 29, 2017

Food For Thought: My Take

Before making my million Rand move, I need to plan what I’ll do with it once I have it. This is why it’s so important to adjust my mindset beforehand and have a plan for what percentage I’ll spend, save and invest. Even how I’ll scale myself while building a plan, because nothing in life goes exactly according to plan. In my mind when I'm halfway to reaching my goal, I planned on implementing my money plan. For the percentage I invest, will it all be invested in my business or other investments also?

As I get about 80 percent of the way there, I planned on re-evaluate what I really want, because I know the situation changes after one earn those first seven figures. I also planned to keep my eyes peeled and my ear to the ground for the next opportunity to expand my business. Where’s the money, where’s the next revolution, where’s everything moving toward? As I continue to hone my skills at more quickly figuring out who has the background, budget and willingness to buy from me or help expand my business. Too many people get caught up in the long-term opportunities sacrificing everything today. I’m willing to sacrifice 30 percent or 50 percent today for the bigger long-term opportunity but I won’t sacrifice 90 percent. Getting some money today is important for my mindset. Where is the money flowing? How do I find the money? I pay attention to social media, economic shifts, hot new trends and what’s in. One mutually beneficial way I do this is by mentoring young entrepreneurs. I observe new trends they’re high on. They benefit from my business experience. I realised that when I chose this path, my mentoring benefits them and their trendiness has become invaluable to me.

I always look at the bigger picture to improve my business. One thing is to take care of my customer’s needs, answer their questions and provide human support for them. Legendary customer service is rare these days so it’s a neglected way I stand out above my competitors. I allow people to understand who I'm and I work with integrity. I respond to questions quickly and efficiently so they’re confident that’s how I do business and will continue to do so in the future. This is one thing I did get right throughout my entrepreneurial journey.

I also discovered that It’s much easier to work with fewer people who pay me less than a ton of people who pay me more. Therefore I partner with people who support me and have my back, those who don’t let money be the sole driver of the relationship. I learned that the way to earn trust and deepen these relationships is through mutual respect which makes it easy for me to walk away from certain deals. Identifying and creating strategic alliances is another thing I have done well from the start. The final thought that fosters my plan is my intention to build a quick and nimble business that could adapt in this crazy, fast-paced modern world. I sought mentors who had already achieved what I'm looking to do and followed their advice. Remember, knowledge isn’t power. Applied knowledge is power. I therefore, foster a culture in my business that encourages failure because I'm reaching for big ideas. I always learn from those failures and emphasize to each of my business partners that the main goal is co-creating opportunities together. This builds trust that I’ll have their back during tough times and they’ll do the same for you.....

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Planning My Moves......

Once in a while, technology presents us with a sea of change in terms of how things are done. In the late 1700s, that great paradigm shift was interchangeable parts. It was a quest to make as many products as possible compatible with as many other products as possible. As I prepare my 2020 outlook, I'm looking at a new game-changing innovation: 3D printing. Essentially: a way to print out objects of various use utilizing a printer. It's designed to be low-cost compared to traditional manufacturing methods, and wants to make object creation as easy and cheap as printing out a document. Chances are good you’ve seen both humble and extraordinary examples of how 3D printing will revolutionize a variety of industries. From public infrastructure to home repair, 3D printing is changing how we are doing business, perform basic maintenance and even build brand-new structures.

Given all these exciting applications, it goes without saying that 3D printers won't have a single application or niche when they finally come of age. Instead, they're creating opportunities for individuals and professionals of all stripes and from all corners of the business world. Though we tend to think of 3D printing as only impacting the tech world, the truth is even highly industrialized processes could benefit from it. I looked at one huge global market – manufacturing – and how 3D printing could potentially impact it. Will I ever be able to profit from the manufacturing sector right from my home design studio? DIY manufacturing for DIY employment......

For anybody seeking autonomy in their career in my view, freelancing and entrepreneurship have long provided exciting opportunities for self-employment. Indeed, by some recent estimates, more than half the future workforce will take on some kind of freelancing work by 2020 and many may have transitioned entirely to independent contractor status. This will be a significant migration from the traditional to the home-based workplace. Now, with 3D printing on the scene, there will be even more ways to turn my free time and my properties into money-generating manufacturing assets. I have considered my abilities to perform design work, create prototypes quickly and perform product testing more quickly than ever before. 3D printing makes it all possible.

I discovered three benefits of 3D printing technology:

1) A lower barrier of entry for small businesses While it’s true that 3D printers are still prohibitively expensive for average hobbyists, some models are now becoming cheap as laptop computers. That’s a crucial pivot point, because 3D printers could very nearly become impulse-worthy purchases in the near future. The technology will be nothing short of a revelation for small-business owners such as myself who want to create niche-specific or limited-run products. Outsourcing to traditional manufacturing workshops could result in a first prototype run that costs at low cost. Compare that with the cost of purchasing a 3D printer and you see the potential. The point is, the physical footprint — not to mention the startup capital — required to start a business of any kind shrinks smaller and smaller when 3D printers enter the mix. As entrepreneur in a dizzying array of industries — electronics/electrical, and mechanical designs and maintenance — I'll be discovering new entry points into manufacturing thanks to the smaller and more affordable production runs made possible by 3D printing. I had to just look at how many types of products can be made this way. Kids’ toys, replacement parts, PC and smartphone peripherals, you name it – the sky becomes the limit now. If you’ve ever had a clever idea for a product you wanted to bring to market, there’s never been a better time to take a crack at it. START 'EM YOUNG. Mattel's ThingMaker allows kids to 3D print their own toys. Image from Mattel

2) No more physical inventory - The catch-22 of doing business in the manufacturing industry is this: If you want to sell enough products to make your small business your full-time occupation, you first need a place to store all those products. However, if you want a place to store all those products, you must first do enough business to justify the expense. Limited physical space for inventory can be crippling to a nascent small business. Enter 3D printers. As a small-business owner, I could do small production runs or even one-offs, storing a bunch of products will no longer be necessary (Print as people order). Then there’s the question of what happens to unsold products that are no longer modern. When incremental changes were made to a product to iron out bugs or improve the experience, existing stock of the outdated product needed to be liquidated quickly, and sometimes at a loss. Not so with 3D printers. I only need to physically manufacture inventory when it’s needed. It’s the key concept behind lean manufacturing — and now it’s coming to the small-business world, where, it’s even more crucial than in the corporate space. Since everybody owns a smartphone, the entrepreneurial world is abuzz with third-party cases, batteries, cables, stands and a host of other products that make interfacing with our favorite screens even easier. Say you're one of these independent case manufacturers. Your product is constantly in danger of becoming obsolete after the new model drops. With 3D printing, it's easier than ever to make small changes so your products stay abreast of the newest features and physical changes dreamed up by Apple, Samsung and Google. That’s just one example. Keeping a limited inventory of products – either because of space restrictions or because you cater to an industry that’s in constant flux – could be a game-changer for a lot of industrialists.

3) Longer useful lifetimes for a variety of products. Look,  I’ve done my share of griping about low-quality goods designed with obsolescence in mind. Now, with 3D printers on the scene, products approaching the end of their useful lives can be given a second chance at redemption. Think about it: For a hundred years, major manufacturers produced only a fixed quantity of replacement parts for their refrigerators, lawnmowers, mobile phones, mechanical parts and a virtually endless variety of other consumer products. Or here's an example that's closer to home: charging cables. After a few years, when those items have been replaced with flashier models and the stock of available replacement or maintenance parts is gone for the older ones, customers are left in the lurch. There’s an opportunity here for clever entrepreneurs to make a few bucks. Consider the small engine-repair shop that sees all kinds of obsolete equipment come through their doors throughout the week. Instead of turning these folks away and instructing them to buy new equipment, these small shops can now produce near-OEM-quality replacement parts even for products that have outlived their useful lives. 3D printers might just make it possible once more to buy it for life, as the saying goes, instead of sticking to brutal, manufacturer-devised cycles of obsolescence. New territory, new stigmas.

Make no mistake: The technology is young. The price is still somewhat high and the overall quality of its output still has a ways to improve. But with time, it will. I'm keeping an eye out so I'll be able to utilize it when the time comes. Since 3D printing is still finding its legs, that means 3D printing entrepreneurs might find themselves fighting stigmas. It takes a while to convince people. Right now, people will still be wary that 3D-printed parts might be drastically cheaper or less robust than their traditionally produced counterparts. However, with the right product and message, I'm convinced that 3D printing could open doors for my small business and career that I assumed were only open to established companies.

Friday, December 30, 2016

My Branding | Entreprenuer

Holidays! What Holidays? Having a creative mindset with some experience in design allows me to continue looking at key areas of my marketing skills such as branding, product development, research and  communication. I considered what role design plays in them whilst finding opportunities to use design to make brands more visible and to add value to my services. I now know that design deserves more attention than it frequently receives from business owners and managers.

You see, Design has often been seen as a finishing touch in product or service development - something to be used after the strategy has been formulated, key decisions have been made and budgets have been allocated. I have managed to convince some design businesses to include brand design as part of their business strategy from the outset. This is because involving brand design at an early stage can save you money and result in a better offering and a better experience for your customers. You don't necessarily need a professional designer to use design strategically - just looking for new ways to meet your customers' needs is an important step in taking advantage of the benefits of brand design. Making even minor changes can provide considerable rewards. Part of my work process include finding out what customers want which is an essential starting point in designing competitive brand. The more I discover about customers' preferences from market research and design-led user research, the more likely I am to create the kind of brand they'll want to pay for........
c. 2015, Mabule Business Holdings

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