My Background

I am a freelancing entrepreneur who is task-oriented, pay attention to details and a team-worker. I'm also an avid investor in small ideas, keen reader and social activist who is enthusiastic in finding new opportunities by combining creative and analytical skills. I'm also a strategist who is systematic in approaching challenges. I grew up around farming communities, urban townships, mining towns and city metropolis within the various provinces in South Africa. This exposure lead me to be interested in human interaction and to appreciate what the human mind is capable of achieving. Through my vast interaction with different people, I managed to increasing my personal network. It became clear at an early stage of my life with the ability to spot opportunities which made me by nature, to become a social enterprenuer.....

Social Entrepreneur:
noun
  1. defined as a person who establishes an enterprise with the aim of solving social problems or effecting social change.

As an individual with a positive outlook towards my challenges, I've embarked on the most interesting journeys in my life which I intend on documenting. These are the glimpse of my trials and tribulations because I believe that: "You must believe you are the best and then make sure that you are...".. I was once told that: "If you don't have enough money then you haven't helped enough people yet". The road to riches is paved with acquisition of specific knowledge.

Favorite Quote:

“A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

My Work Experience:
Technician | Draughtsman | Project Planner

Previous Position(s)

Executive Director | Dihlakanyane Trading (Pty) Ltd. t/a Instructor Labs
Tshwane, South Africa | February 2012 - April 2016
Director of Operations | Dithokeng Cleaning Services cc
Tshwane, South Africa | August 2006 - December 2007
Managing Director | Keyamo Management Solutions (Pty) Ltd. t/a Keyamo Technologies
Johannesburg, South Africa | April 2003 - November 2016
Managing Member | Mamphake Office Supplies cc t/a Mamphake Designs
Rayton, South Africa | July 1999 - February 2017

Sole Proprietor | Mamphake Mabule t/a Documan Consulting
Rayton, South Africa | 2012 - 2017

Current Occupation(s)

Mechanical Electrical Piping (MEP) Systems Technician:

Specialising in systems design and installation of Fire detection and Alarms, CCTV and Electronic Article Surveilance, Remote Access Control, Electric pumps and motors, Electric security fencing and Solar power, Central Heating Ventillation and Air-conditioning, Video and Audio systems, Programmable Logic Circuits Controller as well as Computer Networking.

Freelancer & Entreprenuer
My Education and Skill(s):
  • Managerial experience:
  • I have Operational, Production and Marketing management skills specialising in operations within the engineering and construction environment using Building Information Modelling, Microsoft Office & Project, ACCPAC & Pastel (SAGE) Accounting softwares. I studied B-com: Management including a Programme in Financial Management at UNISA - I evaluated and prepared bids as well as compilling project programming while assisting clients with the approval processes. I also prepared reports including project costing/estimates and quantitative statistical calculations. I also supervised and monitor in-house and on-site production while planning and allocating work using work orders and production schedules. I marketed electromechanical products, liaise with customer while developing new and improving existing range of products and services.
  • Technical experience:
  • I have computer-aided draughting, manufacturing as well as computer programming skills specialising in operations within the engineering and construction environmemt using AutoCAD, SketchUp Pro, CoralDraw, SQL Database Design, G-code programming, HTML, Visual Basic, Python, and Javascript. I studied course(s) in Architectural Draughting and AutoCAD at Inscape College; Mechanical Draughting and Technologies at Tshwane South TVET College; and N-Dip: Electrical Engineering at Tshwane University of Technology. I designed databases while providing computer network support using MySql and File servers, Active directory, DHCP & DNS server applications. I also procured, installed and commissioned equipment, wired premises, supervised workshop repairs and fabrications, prepared detailed drawings, schematics including construction documentation while training end-user in the correct use and maintenance of systems, as well as interpreted CAD/CAM detailed drawings according to the South African National Standards including the Occupational Health and Safety Regulations.

  • My main focus is building my own product brand and finding energy efficient sustainable solutions.....

Monday, May 29, 2017

Food For Thought: My Take


Before making my million Rand move, I need to plan what I’ll do with it once I have it. This is why it’s so important to adjust my mindset beforehand and have a plan for what percentage I’ll spend, save and invest. Even how I’ll scale myself while building a plan, because nothing in life goes exactly according to plan. In my mind when I'm halfway to reaching my goal, I planned on implementing my money plan. For the percentage I invest, will it all be invested in my business or other investments also?

As I get about 80 percent of the way there, I planned on re-evaluate what I really want, because I know the situation changes after one earn those first seven figures. I also planned to keep my eyes peeled and my ear to the ground for the next opportunity to expand my business. Where’s the money, where’s the next revolution, where’s everything moving toward? As I continue to hone my skills at more quickly figuring out who has the background, budget and willingness to buy from me or help expand my business. Too many people get caught up in the long-term opportunities sacrificing everything today. I’m willing to sacrifice 30 percent or 50 percent today for the bigger long-term opportunity but I won’t sacrifice 90 percent. Getting some money today is important for my mindset. Where is the money flowing? How do I find the money? I pay attention to social media, economic shifts, hot new trends and what’s in. One mutually beneficial way I do this is by mentoring young entrepreneurs. I observe new trends they’re high on. They benefit from my business experience. I realised that when I chose this path, my mentoring benefits them and their trendiness has become invaluable to me.

I always look at the bigger picture to improve my business. One thing is to take care of my customer’s needs, answer their questions and provide human support for them. Legendary customer service is rare these days so it’s a neglected way I stand out above my competitors. I allow people to understand who I'm and I work with integrity. I respond to questions quickly and efficiently so they’re confident that’s how I do business and will continue to do so in the future. This is one thing I did get right throughout my entrepreneurial journey.

I also discovered that It’s much easier to work with fewer people who pay me less than a ton of people who pay me more. Therefore I partner with people who support me and have my back, those who don’t let money be the sole driver of the relationship. I learned that the way to earn trust and deepen these relationships is through mutual respect which makes it easy for me to walk away from certain deals. Identifying and creating strategic alliances is another thing I have done well from the start. The final thought that fosters my plan is my intention to build a quick and nimble business that could adapt in this crazy, fast-paced modern world. I sought mentors who had already achieved what I'm looking to do and followed their advice. Remember, knowledge isn’t power. Applied knowledge is power. I therefore, foster a culture in my business that encourages failure because I'm reaching for big ideas. I always learn from those failures and emphasize to each of my business partners that the main goal is co-creating opportunities together. This builds trust that I’ll have their back during tough times and they’ll do the same for you.....

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Planning My Moves......



Once in a while, technology presents us with a sea of change in terms of how things are done. In the late 1700s, that great paradigm shift was interchangeable parts. It was a quest to make as many products as possible compatible with as many other products as possible. As I prepare my 2020 outlook, I'm looking at a new game-changing innovation: 3D printing. Essentially: a way to print out objects of various use utilizing a printer. It's designed to be low-cost compared to traditional manufacturing methods, and wants to make object creation as easy and cheap as printing out a document. Chances are good you’ve seen both humble and extraordinary examples of how 3D printing will revolutionize a variety of industries. From public infrastructure to home repair, 3D printing is changing how we are doing business, perform basic maintenance and even build brand-new structures.

Given all these exciting applications, it goes without saying that 3D printers won't have a single application or niche when they finally come of age. Instead, they're creating opportunities for individuals and professionals of all stripes and from all corners of the business world. Though we tend to think of 3D printing as only impacting the tech world, the truth is even highly industrialized processes could benefit from it. I looked at one huge global market – manufacturing – and how 3D printing could potentially impact it. Will I ever be able to profit from the manufacturing sector right from my home design studio? DIY manufacturing for DIY employment......

For anybody seeking autonomy in their career in my view, freelancing and entrepreneurship have long provided exciting opportunities for self-employment. Indeed, by some recent estimates, more than half the future workforce will take on some kind of freelancing work by 2020 and many may have transitioned entirely to independent contractor status. This will be a significant migration from the traditional to the home-based workplace. Now, with 3D printing on the scene, there will be even more ways to turn my free time and my properties into money-generating manufacturing assets. I have considered my abilities to perform design work, create prototypes quickly and perform product testing more quickly than ever before. 3D printing makes it all possible.

I discovered three benefits of 3D printing technology:

1) A lower barrier of entry for small businesses While it’s true that 3D printers are still prohibitively expensive for average hobbyists, some models are now becoming cheap as laptop computers. That’s a crucial pivot point, because 3D printers could very nearly become impulse-worthy purchases in the near future. The technology will be nothing short of a revelation for small-business owners such as myself who want to create niche-specific or limited-run products. Outsourcing to traditional manufacturing workshops could result in a first prototype run that costs at low cost. Compare that with the cost of purchasing a 3D printer and you see the potential. The point is, the physical footprint — not to mention the startup capital — required to start a business of any kind shrinks smaller and smaller when 3D printers enter the mix. As entrepreneur in a dizzying array of industries — electronics/electrical, and mechanical designs and maintenance — I'll be discovering new entry points into manufacturing thanks to the smaller and more affordable production runs made possible by 3D printing. I had to just look at how many types of products can be made this way. Kids’ toys, replacement parts, PC and smartphone peripherals, you name it – the sky becomes the limit now. If you’ve ever had a clever idea for a product you wanted to bring to market, there’s never been a better time to take a crack at it. START 'EM YOUNG. Mattel's ThingMaker allows kids to 3D print their own toys. Image from Mattel

2) No more physical inventory - The catch-22 of doing business in the manufacturing industry is this: If you want to sell enough products to make your small business your full-time occupation, you first need a place to store all those products. However, if you want a place to store all those products, you must first do enough business to justify the expense. Limited physical space for inventory can be crippling to a nascent small business. Enter 3D printers. As a small-business owner, I could do small production runs or even one-offs, storing a bunch of products will no longer be necessary (Print as people order). Then there’s the question of what happens to unsold products that are no longer modern. When incremental changes were made to a product to iron out bugs or improve the experience, existing stock of the outdated product needed to be liquidated quickly, and sometimes at a loss. Not so with 3D printers. I only need to physically manufacture inventory when it’s needed. It’s the key concept behind lean manufacturing — and now it’s coming to the small-business world, where, it’s even more crucial than in the corporate space. Since everybody owns a smartphone, the entrepreneurial world is abuzz with third-party cases, batteries, cables, stands and a host of other products that make interfacing with our favorite screens even easier. Say you're one of these independent case manufacturers. Your product is constantly in danger of becoming obsolete after the new model drops. With 3D printing, it's easier than ever to make small changes so your products stay abreast of the newest features and physical changes dreamed up by Apple, Samsung and Google. That’s just one example. Keeping a limited inventory of products – either because of space restrictions or because you cater to an industry that’s in constant flux – could be a game-changer for a lot of industrialists.

3) Longer useful lifetimes for a variety of products. Look,  I’ve done my share of griping about low-quality goods designed with obsolescence in mind. Now, with 3D printers on the scene, products approaching the end of their useful lives can be given a second chance at redemption. Think about it: For a hundred years, major manufacturers produced only a fixed quantity of replacement parts for their refrigerators, lawnmowers, mobile phones, mechanical parts and a virtually endless variety of other consumer products. Or here's an example that's closer to home: charging cables. After a few years, when those items have been replaced with flashier models and the stock of available replacement or maintenance parts is gone for the older ones, customers are left in the lurch. There’s an opportunity here for clever entrepreneurs to make a few bucks. Consider the small engine-repair shop that sees all kinds of obsolete equipment come through their doors throughout the week. Instead of turning these folks away and instructing them to buy new equipment, these small shops can now produce near-OEM-quality replacement parts even for products that have outlived their useful lives. 3D printers might just make it possible once more to buy it for life, as the saying goes, instead of sticking to brutal, manufacturer-devised cycles of obsolescence. New territory, new stigmas.

Make no mistake: The technology is young. The price is still somewhat high and the overall quality of its output still has a ways to improve. But with time, it will. I'm keeping an eye out so I'll be able to utilize it when the time comes. Since 3D printing is still finding its legs, that means 3D printing entrepreneurs might find themselves fighting stigmas. It takes a while to convince people. Right now, people will still be wary that 3D-printed parts might be drastically cheaper or less robust than their traditionally produced counterparts. However, with the right product and message, I'm convinced that 3D printing could open doors for my small business and career that I assumed were only open to established companies.

Friday, December 30, 2016

My Branding | Entreprenuer



Holidays! What Holidays? Having a creative mindset with some experience in design allows me to continue looking at key areas of my marketing skills such as branding, product development, research and  communication. I considered what role design plays in them whilst finding opportunities to use design to make brands more visible and to add value to my services. I now know that design deserves more attention than it frequently receives from business owners and managers.

You see, Design has often been seen as a finishing touch in product or service development - something to be used after the strategy has been formulated, key decisions have been made and budgets have been allocated. I have managed to convince some design businesses to include brand design as part of their business strategy from the outset. This is because involving brand design at an early stage can save you money and result in a better offering and a better experience for your customers. You don't necessarily need a professional designer to use design strategically - just looking for new ways to meet your customers' needs is an important step in taking advantage of the benefits of brand design. Making even minor changes can provide considerable rewards. Part of my work process include finding out what customers want which is an essential starting point in designing competitive brand. The more I discover about customers' preferences from market research and design-led user research, the more likely I am to create the kind of brand they'll want to pay for........

http://mamphake.blogspot.com
c. 2015, Mabule Business Holdings

Long Journey Ahead.......



To You My Friends,
Life is a long journey, A long, long journey - a journey that begins with a tear,
And still ends in sore tear, A journey full of distresses, Possessed by variety and differences, But one thing I and you should know, Never destroy the Bridges, Over which we crossed to get where we are,
Today this is mine, Tomorrow the yours may be nine, So that I need and must appreciate, Nevertheless, don't forget me also to congratulate, When I offend you please forgive, And am in need, don't forget to give, For one thing I should - you should know, Never to destroy the bridges, Over which we crossed to get where we are,
For now you may not need me, But tomorrow it may turn to me, Don't despise I say Don't look down on me, Because a bridge that you'll need someday I may be - when you'll need to cross over back, When we are forced to retrace our back, Then the interest we didn't think of when destroying the bridges, Remains the only option for our lives to get there,
My friends thank you so much, You were a help to me that much, When i needed you most you assisted me, Laughing you did it not forgetting me, Through the tough storms we've sailed, so much and yet still is said, Because one thing you and I do know, Never to destroy the bridges, Over which we cross to get where we are, Merry Christmas to you.
Yours Truly,
Mamphake Mabule
http://mabule.blogspot.com
c. 2016, Mabule Business Holdings

Sunday, December 4, 2016

Defining My Passion

If you consult the dictionary, you will see that passion is described as “a strong and barely controllable emotion.” But If you ask me, passion represent that inner and crazy power you suddenly get and need to fight for that something that you believe in and you want to build. And if you want to know something about passionate people, I can tell you that it doesn’t matter the subject of their madness. As a freelancer, who has dedicated his time to a hobby that some may find crazy, but where my resulted products are just as much a work-of-art......

Pop-Up Store: My Viable Strategy

With Pop-up Store, cheaper may not always be the most cost-effective option in the long run. For instance, renting a shelf or table space from an existing retailer may the least expensive option, but if it’s going to compromise the shopping experience or products I wish to sell, then it probably won’t give me the best ROI. I firstly determine factors in my budget, the amount of merchandise I'm selling and the experience I want my customers to have, before going with the pop-up store  strategy which gives me a healthy balance between the three.
Collaborating with other merchants: I've learned that I don’t have to venture into the pop-up space alone. When looking to minimize costs, I always considered partnering up with other merchants. I normally find enterprenuers that complement my business and see if we can set up shop together. As a group, we can share the costs, pool efforts on acquiring fixtures to help merchandise the space, split responsibilities of store hours, and co-market the pop-up experience.
I prefer to clearly decide the dynamic of the group and that I align my brand with other merchants that create a truly branded experience that is going to elevate my message and amplify my reach to the right audience.
Negotiating with the landlord: As matter of principle, I will never sign any rental agreement without haggling a bit. I normally bring up the following factors when negotiating - Rent, Refundable deposit, Utilities, and Insurance. Alternatively, I consider drawing up a different type of arrangement with the owners. Rather than pay rent, I also arrange for an easy profit sharing agreement.
Monitoring peak hours and staff accordingly: One of my top cost-saving strategy for my budget pop-up is to pay attention to my store’s peak hours and staff as necessary. That way, I won’t end up paying for help I don’t necessarily need. I monitor the number of visitors at any given time (using foot traffic analytics tools) so I can set shifts and schedules accordingly.
In short, My Pop-up store strategy introduces my business to customers more informally, like a table at a flea market. More shaking hands and trading stories, less of everything else that takes me away from my customer. The louwer of a smaller investment to start a pop-up store compared to a traditional retail store which could be 80% cheaper, makes the economy look a little brighter when people are still pinching their cents. Since my pop-up store is more exclusive than traditional retail store, I have an easier time getting publicity from my social media outlets. Viral marketing helps too. Again, there's a time constraint, so urgency is easy to sell when I've got a product that people like. When I develop a new market or a new product, I use my pop-up store as a great way to test the waters before fully committing to a dedicated product development. Majority of my sales still take place in person but the Pop-up store allow my Internet-based business to sell offline, potentially creating a brand new niche market.

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

My Creed | Engineering


Dedicated to my woman.....

I am the very model of an engineering graduate; I work with systems and with problems both of nature delicate; I’ve studied properties of things in motion for the hell of it, Regurgitating answers to insure that my government ticket I’ll get;

I’ve studied design and learned the formulas of saturate solutions in normality that are immaculate, And programmed machines with large routines, I’ve written just so that Infrequently will I encounter problems that I can’t attack; I’m very good at systems both in digital and analogue; Have studied great philosophers; and can quote their dialogue;

I’ll work all day and never quit, that is if I can manage it; I am the very model of an engineering graduate.
I use my calculator for the answers found in calculus, And problems most encountered in numerical analysis;
Eventually I’ll run my own engineering firm.

My interests are much greater than my friends and colleagues might believe; I’ve worked with magic and performed illusions written to deceive; I’ve worked with people who do not receive the help and dedication they require so they might achieve.

My years of work have allowed me to become involved in engineering problems that have only partially been solved. My grades, might not reflect my success, and that’s why I am the
model of an engineering graduate......

Mamphake Mabule
c. 2016, Mabule Business Holdings

My Profile