My Background

I am a freelancer and entrepreneur who is task-oriented, pay attention to details and a team-worker. I'm also an avid investor in small ideas, keen reader and social activist who is enthusiastic in finding new opportunities by combining creative and analytical skills. I'm also a strategist who is systematic in approaching challenges. I grew up around farming communities, urban townships, mining towns and city metropolis within the various provinces in South Africa. This exposure lead me to be interested in human interaction and to appreciate what the human mind is capable of achieving. Through my vast interaction with different people, I managed to increasing my personal network. It became clear at an early stage of my life with the ability to spot opportunities which made me by nature, to become a social enterprenuer.....

Social Entrepreneur:
noun
  1. defined as a person who establishes an enterprise with the aim of solving social problems or effecting social change.

As an individual with a positive outlook towards my challenges, I've embarked on the most interesting journeys in my life which I intend on documenting. These are the glimpse of my trials and tribulations because I believe that: "You must believe you are the best and then make sure that you are...".. I was once told that: "If you don't have enough money then you haven't helped enough people yet". The road to riches is paved with acquisition of specific knowledge.

Favorite Quote:

“A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

My Work Experience:
Technician | Draughtsman | Project Manager

Previous Position(s)

Executive Director | Dihlakanyane Trading (Pty) Ltd. t/a Instructor Labs
Tshwane, South Africa | February 2012 - April 2016
Director of Operations | Dithokeng Cleaning Services cc
Tshwane, South Africa | August 2006 - December 2007
Managing Director | Keyamo Management Solutions (Pty) Ltd. t/a Keyamo Technologies
Johannesburg, South Africa | April 2003 - November 2016
Design Draughtsman | Mamphake Office Supplies cc t/a Mamphake Designs
Rayton, South Africa | July 1999 - February 2017


Current Position(s)

Property Consultant | Mamphake Mabule t/a Documan Consulting
Rayton, South Africa | 2012 - present


Freelancer & Entreprenuer
My Education and Skill(s):
  • Management:
  • I am a Project manager with Financial, Production and Marketing skills who is operating within the building and construction environment using BIM, Microsoft Office & Project, ACCPAC & Pastel (SAGE) Accounting softwares, Open Workbench including working on Building automation systems. I studied BCom:Management; and a Programme:Financial Management at UNISA - I evaluate and prepare bids and specifications while assisting clients in the approval processes. I also prepare reports including project costing/estimates and statistical calculations. I also supervise and monitor production in-house and on-site while training personnel in the use and correct installation of products. I plan and allocate work using work orders and production schedules. I market products, liaise with customer while developing new and improving existing range of products and services.
  • Technical:
  • I am a draughtsman and technician with Mechanical, Electrical and Piping skills who operating within the building and construction industry using AutoCAD, SketchUp Pro, CoralDraw, SQL Database Design including software programming in GCode, HTML, Visual Basic, Python, and Javascript. I studied course(s) in Architectural Draughting and AutoCAD at Inscape College; Mechanical Drawing and Design at Tshwane South TVET College; and NDip:Electrical Engineering at Tshwane University of Technology. I prepare and present project documentation, including producing and interpreting CAD/CAM detail drawings according to SANS 10400, SABS 0432, SABS 044, SABS 0144, BS 1553, BS 1635 and BS 3939, SANS 204 and SABS 048. I also fabricate, install, test/repair/modify and maintain electrical and mechanical systems according to SANS 10142, SANS 10198, SANS 10292, SANS 10108, SANS 60079, SANS 61241, SANS 10123 and including the Occupational Health and Safety Act.
  • My passion is finding sustainable and cost-saving solutions while being energy efficient.......

Thursday, January 21, 2016

Stepping Up | Development

As an entrepreneur, I've learned that there's a great difference between an amateur and a professional. As an amateur, I designed my own blogs, change my own oil in my car, and so on. All of this would take up valuable time and effort, causing major frustration in the process. I knew that at a certain point in my business, I couldn't grow any further until I hired a few key people. Nowadays, I leave these duties to the professionals since that's what they do best. This way, I maximize all of my talents, which allows me to reach my highest potential. Today, I only keep the best people around me. It costs a little bit more, but I've learned the value in "paying the price."



One thing that I had to do was to let old friends know that I was moving on in my life. Eventually, I have became fireproof. In the process of reaching my professional goals, I've learned that dealing with people is the most important attribute. Another challenge was creating excuses which was one of my greatest obstacles. I allowed my circumstance to dictate my life, instead of taking control of my life. Eventually, I had to let go of these excuses and limitations. Dealing with adversity was my greatest teacher and it allowed me to build the type of resilience that helped me walk through the fire.

When I became my journey in transforming, I had to check in with my mentors, telling them the brutal truth about my situations. In the process of making myself vulnerable, I was able to gain freedom, releasing myself from false pressures and anxiety. By sharing myself with others, I was able to maximize my efforts and make major breakthroughs in my life. Taking risks requires much faith in myself and others, but it must be done! According to me, Faith is knowing that what I want will eventually happen as long as I believe it. I learned to take major leaps in my life, sometimes not even knowing where it will lead because that's what professionals do......

http://dihlakanyanebooks.blogspot.com 
c. 2016 Mabule Business Holdings

Saturday, January 16, 2016

Life's Lessons | Building Success


As a social entrepreneur, This is the most important post I will be sharing with you to date and I'm going to tell you the secrets which I learned over the many years in my line of work running small businesses. What I'm about tell you may be duplicated by any aspiring young entrepreneur and it is based on my personal experience. You see, from my early years, I not only wanted to work for myself but I found it compelling or a must or a madness of sorts and all because none of the activities I chose as work were classified under any formal education. Due to this reason, I always had a chip on my shoulder because I wanted to prove that I could turn this activities into formal sources of income.



When one is young, one tends to think less about taking risks or the decision making processes and in my case, it was my ambition or desire that was the driving force. Through my life's work I had a lot of setbacks in the early stages of my career but like everyone, I viewed these setbacks as valuable lessons. I had on average about two to three setbacks per year and they ranged from not positioning my business properly to not creating value in the business to losing focus to my choice in partners and so on. Even with these lessons, I wasn't getting anywhere.....until I started to realise that I had to recreate success using what I call aggregates or elements. Let me explain: I'm not talking overnight success or reproducing Patrice Motsepe or Nicky Oppenheimer but creating their success through different elements using my life experience.
Now, I know that these individuals are an exception rather than the rule. I therefore set out to study certain elements of what made them successful, and from my observations and experience, I could actually improve my chances of success over time. Now, in my case the key to success rested on a timeline: The first thing I started looking at was the amount of hours I spend working. This was a thorny issue because as much as I was a hard worker, I was actually just an average worker in my business. I was working on average of 48 hours per week instead of the 80 hours per week which was required. Yeap, I'm talking real work starting with production: designing models to developing programs to training, marketing to managing finances and so on. I'll tell you something, even when I don't feel like going to work, I still come to work - why do I do that? Simply put, it's got to be done!



The other element in the aggregate consist of self growth. And it happens to be the glue that stick the mix together. I'll tell you why, I realised that my setbacks were due to lack of experience and unfortunately I couldn't call on the assistance of a mentor. The most accessible resource for me was books and in the beginning, I use to read an average of 8 books per year with the normal excuse of not having enough time. Not much I know, I'm now reading 96 books a year and I'm not talking just talking any books. Instead, I read books that I use to improve on my business and personal growth. Through this learning process, I managed to reduce my setbacks both personal and in business to an average of two every 10 years which means that I take less time recovering. I know that one cannot avoid interruptions but I remain focus.
When coming to changing industries, I too was guilty with an average change in every 3 years with many excuses ranging from the business not working out to having other business opportunities and so on. Don't get me wrong, the new experiences were valuable but I learned that most people with whom I shared knowledge when working in specific industries had an average of 20 years experience. Be it a family business member or a director in a corporate, Now these individuals had managed to create real value over time in terms of equity by simply positioning themselves and mastering the process of picking associates to managing risks and so on. To me this is an important element because of the value created. With that said, I have a lot of diverse knowledge to share and with another 35 years, god willing, to build on my business and in so doing leaving my legacy.....
c. 2016, Mabule Business Holdings

Saturday, January 9, 2016

Philanthropic Work | Community Development

Philanthropy (from Greek φιλανθρωπίαetymologically means "love of humanity" in the sense of caring, nourishing, developing and enhancing "what it is to be human" on both the benefactors' (by identifying and exercising their values in giving and volunteering) and beneficiaries' (by benefiting) parts. The most conventional modern definition is "private initiatives, for public good, focusing on quality of life". This combines the social scientific aspect developed in the 20th century with the original humanistic tradition, and serves to contrast philanthropy with business (private initiatives for private good, focusing on material prosperity) and government(public initiatives for public good, focusing on law and order).
As a social entrepreneur, I have learned that there are instances of philanthropy which commonly overlap with instances of charity, though not all charity is philanthropy, or vice versa. The difference commonly cited is that charity relieves the pains of social problems, whereas philanthropy attempts to solve those problems at their root causes (the difference between giving a hungry person a fish, and teaching them how to fish). The reason why I always advocate for philanthropy......
c. 2016, Mabule Business Holdings

Saturday, January 2, 2016

Social Entrepreneurship | Opinion


I get questions: What do mean when say you are a social entrepreneur and what is social entrepreneurship? Well, first of all social entrepreneurship is a growing global movement. More and more institution of higher learning around the world are now offering courses on social entrepreneurship, with governments and corporations alike setting up social innovation funds and incubators; and many young people I talked with all over the world tell me they work or run social enterprises or have become social entrepreneurs in their own right. Clearly social entrepreneurship has come into its own, recognized as a model that combines the financial disciplines of market capitalism with the passion and compassion required to create a more fair and just world.



But really what is social entrepreneurship? Put simply, it’s the use of new approaches to solve old social problems. Throughout history there have been social change agents and activists who have put their societies on a better path. But over the past couple of decades, a distinct, more entrepreneurial approach to alleviating the problems associated with poverty has emerged. That path-breaking generation of social entrepreneurs broke free of the false dichotomy between “it’s a business” or “it’s a charity” to experiment with business models, innovate new distribution and replication methods, and hold themselves accountable for results.
Social innovation is not just an invention. Social innovation has to do with how that invention, whether it’s a change in a product or a process or a new organisation, actually changes the status quo, is sustainable over time, and has a big scalable impact on a large group of people, particularly poorer, vulnerable populations. Take a new water pump, for example. There are some great new water pumps that work well in the lab. But how will you distribute them to communities that need them? How will you change people’s behaviour so that they use them?



What’s the business model behind the endeavor to ensure the pumps are well maintained and the model is scalable and sustainable? That’s the difference between an invention and a social innovation.
In the South African context, we are faced with educational challenges which then present opportunities for social entrepreneurs to tackle. Whether for-profit or non-profit, whether working in education or healthcare or employment, social enterprises all share certain characteristics. The first is innovation. The innovation can take the form of new products and services, new production and distribution methods, or new organizational models. For example, First Book designed a new distribution model to serve low-income children with top quality education content, while mothers2mothers in South Africa tapped into a new labour supply – HIV positive mothers, called Mentor Mothers – to reduce dramatically the mother-to-child HIV transmission rate in pregnant women.



Creating the greatest impact requires leveraging market forces and business practices wherever possible. That means generating income from the sale of your products or services, yes, but it also means driving a relentless results-based focus throughout the organization, just as any commercial enterprise would. This requires strong accountability and auditing systems, robust strategic planning processes, the discipline to measure what’s working and what’s not, and the flexibility to adjust sales channels or product lines accordingly. In addition to continuous innovation and business practices, social entrepreneurs have two other key characteristics in common. The first is that they maintain an openness to learning. Social entrepreneurship, after all, is a learning process by design and the reason why I put more emphasis on continues learning to acquire new skills.



Finally, and most importantly of all, social entrepreneurs are driven by values: dignity, access to opportunity, transparency, accountability, equity, and empowerment. We are passionate about the problem that we are trying to solve and keep our social mission front and centre as we scale up our impact. In many cases we have left potentially lucrative careers to found our social enterprise, motivated by a desire for a more meaningful purpose or struck by an “aha” moment that compelled us to act........



c. 2016, Mabule Business Holdings

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